PechaKucha Reflection Paragraph

Well-done Team 9.

When deciding on which topic to talk about, we all threw out different ideas and discussed which ones would work or would be interesting and which ideas didn’t have enough subtopics to elaborate on. With all the possible considerations, the team picked the “medium is the message” because the topic itself is pretty broad which therefore gave us the freedom to pick what we wanted to talk about within the subject. When picking out the pictures, we wanted the pictures to reflect what each slide was going to be talked about without giving the message of each slide away. As a team, we decided to meet up on a day before the assignment was due to brainstorm ideas that we could use for our presentation. This helped us very much because we helped each other out and for any questions each of us had, we all tried to answer the best way possible. The hardest part was practicing since we only had 20 seconds per slide. Usually, each slide gives the ideas as to what we’re going to say, but with a PechaKucha, you have to know what you’re going to say due to the time limit. Compared to regular PowerPoint, as stated before, the time limit was challenging. With a PowerPoint, you have the power to put whatever you want on a slide, whether it be bullet points with pictures and animations. In a PechaKucha, you’re limited to one picture per slide for only 20 seconds which makes you have to rehearse and know what you’re going to say.

 

Credits: Team 9

Intro: Branden Daly

Past History: Amanda Bazil

Present History: Geovarney Gooden

Correlation to today’s social media/news: Steven Sarria

Reflection paragraph: Yulisa Morales

 

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Individual Assignment 6: Annotated Bibliography

Hi Geo,

Your sources are good except I don’t see a book.  I understand this is a very topical issue so I will not deduct.  I would have liked to see more annotations to the biblio, but overall well-done.

 

Geovarney Gooden
June 17, 2018
Team 9
Individual Assignment 6: Annotated Bibliography

Thesis: An analysis of how NFL owners caved to the pressure from President Trump’s comments and came up with a new policy that requires all NFL players to stand for the national anthem.

Clay, Gregory. “Scholars Differ on Legality of New Nfl National Anthem Policy.” Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, vol. 35, no. 10, 14 June 2018, pp. 17-19. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.fiu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=130088491&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Annotation: This article is about two main things 1. Can the NFL legally require its players to stand? 2. Do the players have any viable legal recourse? In the article the author explains how the answers for those two questions depends on who you ask and shows how everyone has different views of the topic.

Jarrett, Bell and TODAY USA. “Long, Jenkins Blast NFL’s New Anthem Policy.” USA Today, n.d. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.fiu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=J0E223975144118&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Annotation: This newspaper article shows how two prominent players from the super bowl championship team the Philadelphia Eagles feel about the new anthem policy. This helps with my research because it shows how the owners view the issue and how players view it.

Intravia, Jonathan, et al. “The Racial Divide Surrounding United States of America National Anthem Protests in the National Football League.” Deviant Behavior, vol. 39, no. 8, Aug. 2018, pp. 1058-1068. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/01639625.2017.1399745.

Annotation: This academic journal is about the racial divide of how they each view the protests. This journal entry shows how the issue is viewed very differently between the races.

BAKER, PETER, et al. “President Renews Attack on N.F.L., and Then Criticizes a Host on ESPN.” New York Times, vol. 167, no. 57747, 11 Oct. 2017, p. A16. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.fiu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=125583765&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Annotation: The article informs that the U.S. President Donald Trump has threatened to use federal tax law to penalize the National Football League (NFL) over players kneeling in protest during the national anthem; which was later backed off by the White House.

Seifert, Kevin, and Dan Graziano. “New Policy Requires on-Field Players, Personnel to Stand for Anthem.” ESPN, ESPN Internet Ventures, 24 May 2018, http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/23582533/nfl-owners-approve-new-national-anthem-policy.

Annotation: This article shows how the NFL owners came to a conclusion of how they want to address the NFL protest during the national anthem. It also shows how the NFL players association did not like that they were not consulted. This is important in my research because it shows how the commissioner thought this would make the president not comment anymore.

Leepson, Marc. Flag: an American Biography. Thomas Dunne Books, 2006.
Annotation: This book is about the history of the American flag and how many Americans view this symbol. This helps with my research because it gives perspective on how many American’s would be put off by the protest.

Fake News Assignment​

Hi Team 9, 

Your post is a bit weak in a few areas. 1) the actual images should be inserted in the post and inserted where the writing is relevant to the image. 2) the content is weak (there’s isn’t much about the topic except for the one or two sentence paragraphs which should have been expounded upon some more).  3)  post could be stronger in the ‘fake’ part of the assignment; you could utilize more sarcasm or a sense of the absurd.  Overall, it felt too realistic to actually be fake.

The Reflective Paragraph is rather good though.  I can grade this ‘as is’ or give you the opportunity for a ‘do over’ if you wish.

Team 9:

Amanda Bazil, Branden Daly, Geovarney Gooden, Yulisa Morales, Steven Sarria

-NFL teams going on strike due to new NFL national anthem policy

 

NFL kneeling background knowledge:

https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/05/23/why-do-players-kneel-during-national-anthem

 

NFL national anthem policy:

https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/05/23/nfl-policy-national-anthem-players-kneeling

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/23/sports/nfl-anthem-kneeling.html

 

Spin on topic:

 

          NFL Expected to Lose Millions in Players’ Strike  

The National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA, are exercising their right to refuse to play after NFL announces ban in May.

 

Knowing the influence and reach the sport of football has in the country, the NFLPA hopes to spread awareness of their political beliefs and social activism.

 

After a month-long deliberation and multiple talks with NFL officials to resolve the conflict, the association has come to a decision on the course of action they will take: to strike.

 

NFLPA released a statement stating, “The decision made by NFL CEOs today contradicts the statements said by our Commissioner Roger Goodell and the Chairman of the NFL’s Management Council John Mara about the principles, values, and patriotism of our League.”

 

They have also mentioned that they plan to “challenge any aspect” after an extensive “review” of the policy released by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

 

The NFLPA is standing behind their actions and has stated that “We players have shown our patriotism through our social activism.”

 

They strongly believe that denying them the opportunity (to protest) impedes their First Amendment rights and that for the 2018-2019 season they will go on strike until a common ground resolution is found.  

 

The NFLPA’s actions have also been fueled by the NFL’s de facto ban of activist/NFL players Eric Reid and Colin Kaepernick.  

 

Prior to the announcement, several major NFL players have already planned on sitting out the 2018 season if nothing was done to bring back their fellow players. The NFLPA hopes that this decision will lead to swift action from the NFL so as to not affect the players and the NFL’s schedule season.  

 

In fear of yet another NFL “lockout,” the NFLPA is hoping to have this achieved prior to the season’s start, as they know the NFL fears any sort of revenue lost from the upcoming season.

 

The last NFL “lockout” occurred in 2011, involved 32 teams, lasted 18 weeks but did not affect the regular NFL season.  During the lockout, the players were denied access to all team facilities and amenities, including the team doctor.

 

Many experts, however, are already saying that this strike may be more reminiscent of the NFLPA’s 1982 strike that reduced the NFL season from 16 games to only 9.  

 

After the smoke cleared and the numbers came in, it was revealed that the NFL and its partners lost over $450 million in revenue that season. These numbers don’t take into account the losses felt by local communities who profit off of merchandise and sales for the games.

 

Another NFL lockout only seven years removed from the previous strike would prove huge. Being the biggest sport in the U.S., the NFLPA has put the NFL in a position to meet their demands, or potentially take a huge hit in profit.

 

If nothing is done, the NFLPA may cost many cities around the nation millions of dollars in lost revenue.

 

“We want our message to be heard around the country,” said an anonymous NFL player. “We want to show the country that what the NFL is doing, what they’re trying to do, is not okay.”

 

The NFL has yet to release a statement regarding the announcement, but many Liberals are praising the NFLPA for their “strength” and “cultural sensitivity.”

 

Reflective Paragraph

As a group, we chose to write our fake news article about the NFL owners voting to make a policy that all players must stand for the national anthem which results with the players deciding to take a strike during the 2018-2019 NFL season. How we wrote this article is based on the recent events of the owners meeting in May to come up with a way to solve the protest issue. The reason we wrote this article is that with this event being so current and also being discussed daily on many platforms we felt that our article would have a big impact considering the information we have in our article. Our rhetorical appeal in the article is pathos because the subject surrounding everything from the players protesting during the national anthem, Colin Kaepernick taking a knee leaving him unsigned, and the fans who have different views of the situation is very emotional. Whenever this particular topic is discussed there is always high emotions when the topic is being debated. Our intended audience for this article is for people who support President Donald Trump because this would instantly get a reaction from the president resulting in many of his supporters reading the article about the strike. We grabbed the reader’s attention and maintained credibility by noting in the title that the NFLPA will have an announcement that will cost the players millions along with placing the Players Association statement of the strike at the beginning of the article for credibility.

 

Annotated Bibliography

Hi Amanda,

I reviewed this and commented already. good job!

Amanda Bazil

Team 9

 

 

Thesis: 

The hunger season in South Sudan has negatively affect the lives of millions, particularly its most vulnerable: women and children, because of the ongoing civil war, loss of productive farming grounds, and outrages food prices.

 

Annotated Bibliography for essay:

  1. JOHNSON, DOUGLAS H. The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars: Old Wars and New Wars (Expanded 3rd Edition). NED – New edition ed., Boydell and Brewer, 2016. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt1h64pck.

This book attempts a more complex analysis, briefly examining the historical, political, economic and social factors which have contributed to periodic outbreaks of violence between the state and its peripheries. It discusses the differences between the modern Sudan’s first civil war in the 1960s and today. The author also looks at the series of minor civil wars generated by, and contained within, the major conflict, as well as the regional and international factors – including humanitarian aid – which have exacerbated civil violence.

 

  1. Peter Cutler. “The Political Economy of Famine in Ethiopia and Sudan.” Ambio, vol. 20, no. 5, 1991, pp. 176–178. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/4313816.

AMBIO, a multidisciplinary English language journal, is indexed in more than 40 international databases, and is distributed in more than 100 countries worldwide. AMBIO is published in eight (8) issues per year. Among the subjects covered are: ecology, environmental economics, geology, geochemistry, geophysics, paleontology, hydrology, water resources, oceanography, earth sciences, meteorology, and physical geography.

 

  1. David Lewis/Abyei. “Civil War Threatens Sudan, Again.” Time Magazine, 30 May 2008, http://content.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1810801,00.html

The author explains how the resurfacing of the civil war is causing the nation to spiral further into turmoil. The explosion of the city of Abyei, the fault-line between North and South Sudan, signaled the end to a three-year peace treaty between both militias and the beginning of the Second Sudanese War. The history of the north and south, which has lasted for centuries, is discussed in order to give context as to where the feud between both sides began. Amidst all the cultural and political advertisties both sides share, civilian suffering continues while being largely unnoticed by the world.

 

  1. Editorial Team. “South Sudan Oppositions Accuses Gov’t. Forces of Fresh Attacks in Wau.” Sudan Tribune. 15 June 2018, http://www.sudantribune.com/spip.php?article65655

The Editorial Team, which writes all of the articles for the Sudan Tribune, reports on how the SPLMA/A-IO accused the South Sudanese army of attacking its position in Wau State and called on the UN and regional bodies to investigate the violation of the ceasefire agreement of December 2017. The attack, which happened about two weeks ago, killed ten soldiers which called for more of the government to get involved. This called for the government to intervene, and hundreds of civilians fled villages, yet SPLMO deputy spokesperson says that the government is already preparing for its next attack.

 

  1. Vinograd, Cassandra. “Better that they rape us:’ How the women of South Sudan are speaking out about mass rape.” Pacific Standard. 1 February 2018, https://psmag.com/social-justice/how-the-women-of-south-sudan-are-speaking-out-about-mass-rape

This story follows Cecilia who, like many Sudanese women, has been a victim of sexual violence in South Sudan. Existing long before the occurrence of the civil war in 2013, sexual violence against Sudanese women have gotten aggressively worse, increasing at least five-fold in recent years and doubling the global average. Unfortunately, sexual violence such as rape has carried a weighty and even dangerous stigma in South Sudan. Victims who make it to the U.N. bases in Bentiu are recorded telling the occurrences but aren’t revealing who the victims are. Even when they are speaking about themselves, the women would often say, “my friend”, instead of “I”. The International Rescue Committee, a global humanitarian aid organization, discusses how the stigmatization is becoming a real problem which can be traumatizing and isolating for survivors. Despite the stigma that exists in many Sudanese ethnic groups, Cecilia revealed her story to her family and neighbors, who sought to protect and comfort her, and relishes in the vow her community made: that they will avenge the assault her rapist committed against her.  

 

  1.  Bauza, Peter. “The children’s war.” The Washington’s Post. 10 November 2017, https://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/world/2017/11/10/they-were-rescued-from-war-now-south-sudans-child-soldiers-are-going-back/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.29eb85cb32d8

This story follows the experience of Babacho Mama, an ex-child soldier, and his struggle to remain in school and out of the war. Mama, who lost both parents to an attack by a rival ethnic group, was forced to join the Pibor Militia. Unable to finish primary school, Mama fought until almost a decade later, when a cease-fire was called in 2015 and 1,774 other boys were promised by the U.N. that they would never have to fight again. Implementations of reform schools supported by humanitarian aid surfaced in order to re-introduce these young men back into society, but with the resumption of the war, it has been difficult for these schools to provide the proper education, meal, and support to the students. As a consequence, many of them are considering rejoining their militias, and Mama is one of them. Although their history seems built on fighting, Mama is determined to do different. He realizes the changes he’s facing, but understands that opportunity given at the reform school outweigh the lifestyle he left behind, and is now fighting for his survival.

 

Annotated Bibliography

Hi Amanda,

Nicely done!  Good choice of sources and your annotation are thorough.  I look forward to reading your essay!

Amanda Bazil

Team 9

 

Thesis:

The hunger season in South Sudan has negatively affect the lives of millions, particularly its most vulnerable: women and children, because of the ongoing civil war, loss of productive farming grounds, and outrages food prices.

 

Annotated Bibliography for essay:

  1. JOHNSON, DOUGLAS H. The Root Causes of Sudan’s Civil Wars: Old Wars and New Wars (Expanded 3rd Edition). NED – New edition ed., Boydell and Brewer, 2016. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt1h64pck.

This book attempts a more complex analysis, briefly examining the historical, political, economic and social factors which have contributed to periodic outbreaks of violence between the state and its peripheries. It discusses the differences between the modern Sudan’s first civil war in the 1960s and today. The author also looks at the series of minor civil wars generated by, and contained within, the major conflict, as well as the regional and international factors – including humanitarian aid – which have exacerbated civil violence.

 

  1. Peter Cutler. “The Political Economy of Famine in Ethiopia and Sudan.” Ambio, vol. 20, no. 5, 1991, pp. 176–178. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/4313816.

AMBIO, a multidisciplinary English language journal, is indexed in more than 40 international databases, and is distributed in more than 100 countries worldwide. AMBIO is published in eight (8) issues per year. Among the subjects covered are: ecology, environmental economics, geology, geochemistry, geophysics, paleontology, hydrology, water resources, oceanography, earth sciences, meteorology, and physical geography.

 

  1. David Lewis/Abyei. “Civil War Threatens Sudan, Again.” Time Magazine, 30 May 2008, http://content.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1810801,00.html

The author explains how the resurfacing of the civil war is causing the nation to spiral further into turmoil. The explosion of the city of Abyei, the fault-line between North and South Sudan, signaled the end to a three-year peace treaty between both militias and the beginning of the Second Sudanese War. The history of the north and south, which has lasted for centuries, is discussed in order to give context as to where the feud between both sides began. Amidst all the cultural and political advertisties both sides share, civilian suffering continues while being largely unnoticed by the world.

 

  1. Editorial Team. “South Sudan Oppositions Accuses Gov’t. Forces of Fresh Attacks in Wau.” Sudan Tribune. 15 June 2018, http://www.sudantribune.com/spip.php?article65655

The Editorial Team, which writes all of the articles for the Sudan Tribune, reports on how the SPLMA/A-IO accused the South Sudanese army of attacking its position in Wau State and called on the UN and regional bodies to investigate the violation of the ceasefire agreement of December 2017. The attack, which happened about two weeks ago, killed ten soldiers which called for more of the government to get involved. This called for the government to intervene, and hundreds of civilians fled villages, yet SPLMO deputy spokesperson says that the government is already preparing for its next attack.

 

  1. Vinograd, Cassandra. “Better that they rape us:’ How the women of South Sudan are speaking out about mass rape.” Pacific Standard. 1 February 2018, https://psmag.com/social-justice/how-the-women-of-south-sudan-are-speaking-out-about-mass-rape

This story follows Cecilia who, like many Sudanese women, has been a victim of sexual violence in South Sudan. Existing long before the occurrence of the civil war in 2013, sexual violence against Sudanese women have gotten aggressively worse, increasing at least five-fold in recent years and doubling the global average. Unfortunately, sexual violence such as rape has carried a weighty and even dangerous stigma in South Sudan. Victims who make it to the U.N. bases in Bentiu are recorded telling the occurrences but aren’t revealing who the victims are. Even when they are speaking about themselves, the women would often say, “my friend”, instead of “I”. The International Rescue Committee, a global humanitarian aid organization, discusses how the stigmatization is becoming a real problem which can be traumatizing and isolating for survivors. Despite the stigma that exists in many Sudanese ethnic groups, Cecilia revealed her story to her family and neighbors, who sought to protect and comfort her, and relishes in the vow her community made: that they will avenge the assault her rapist committed against her.

 

  1.  Bauza, Peter. “The children’s war.” The Washington’s Post. 10 November 2017, https://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/world/2017/11/10/they-were-rescued-from-war-now-south-sudans-child-soldiers-are-going-back/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.29eb85cb32d8

This story follows the experience of Babacho Mama, an ex-child soldier, and his struggle to remain in school and out of the war. Mama, who lost both parents to an attack by a rival ethnic group, was forced to join the Pibor Militia. Unable to finish primary school, Mama fought until almost a decade later, when a cease-fire was called in 2015 and 1,774 other boys were promised by the U.N. that they would never have to fight again. Implementations of reform schools supported by humanitarian aid surfaced in order to re-introduce these young men back into society, but with the resumption of the war, it has been difficult for these schools to provide the proper education, meal, and support to the students. As a consequence, many of them are considering rejoining their militias, and Mama is one of them. Although their history seems built on fighting, Mama is determined to do different. He realizes the changes he’s facing, but understands that opportunity given at the reform school outweigh the lifestyle he left behind, and is now fighting for his survival.

 

Draft Thesis Statement

Hi Amanda,

Good thesis. I think you mean ‘outrageous’ food prices.

Amanda Bazil

Draft Thesis Statement

Team 9

Thesis statement:
The hunger season in South Sudan has negatively affected the lives of millions, particularly its most vulnerable: women and children, because of the ongoing civil war, loss of productive farming grounds, and outrages food prices.

 

 

 

I’ve Got A Secret Assignment

Hi Steven,

Well-written post. I might have liked to see more incorporation of information from the lecture/slides, but otherwise good job!

Steven Sarria

Team 9

 

Keeping secrets is hard. Whether its keeping information private for selfish reasons or for the sake of others, everyone in the world has kept secrets multiple times in their lives. Sometimes, you absolutely need to. Keeping personal information, such as a social security number or bank account numbers, are secrets we all must keep for our safety and wellbeing. We’ve all been approached by others to keep a secret for them, for various reasons.

Keeping a secret for someone is a much more difficult task than one would expect. Not long ago, I had to keep a secret for someone close to me. A few months ago, my mother came across a lump in her breast. Nervous, she immediately went to a doctor, who told her she had a tumor. Not knowing yet whether it benign or malignant, my mother became very worried. Having been the one to drive her to the hospital, she told me about the tumor, and that they didn’t know if it was cancerous or not yet. She told me to keep it secret from the rest of the family since she didn’t want to send the family into a panic without knowing if the tumor was deadly or not.

Carrying a secret of that magnitude is rough. Seeing my mom, one of the most cheerful people I know, personally affected by the news was difficult to see. Even more difficult was knowing the reason why and not being able to tell anyone. I’m not sure if she had told my dad, I’m assuming she did, but my two younger brothers had no clue. Neither did my mom’s mom, or anyone else in the extended family. She tried to play it off and pretend like nothing was bothering, but some people saw through the facade, although they were unable to pinpoint what was wrong.

It was difficult to carry that burden. So many times I had to tell people “oh, nothing’s wrong, she’s fine” when she wasn’t. Many times I didn’t know whether to was better for me to treat her carefully because of the news, or to act like everything was normal in an attempt to get her to forget about it for the moment to liven her spirits. I wanted to tell my brothers at least because they deserved to know, but I didn’t want to go against my mother’s wishes. I carried that weight on my shoulders alone.

It made school difficult. Fall semester seemed like it took an eternity, and with all the distractions it was hard to focus in class sometimes. Thankfully, it all worked out in the end. The tumor wasn’t cancerous, and she had it removed. Only then did she tell the majority of her family (excluding her own mother), and told them why she kept it secret. She was thankful I didn’t tell anyone, and I was thankful it was all over.

In the end, I think the secret brought us closer together. At the time, we had a rocky relationship, but her telling me this information and my attempt to protect her and her wishes brought us closer together. After that initial month, our bond felt stronger. I guess some positives did come out of that fiasco.

Sometimes, a secret is thrown upon you, and it is your duty to keep it a secret.