Facebook Scandal Second Draft

Henry, this is about as good as it gets. SK

 

 

By Henry Antenor

Team Fantastic Four

Since the Cambridge Analytica Scandal, Facebook and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg have been under constant pressure from government and the public. Facebook’s security compromise raises worries about user privacy, user information, and mass manipulation during key national events such as the presidential elections. The media have expressed a range of opinions about Facebook, both for and against. The public has not been entirely accepting of Facebook’s wavering reaction to the pressure.

To begin with, the scandal happened when Facebook allowed a third-party researcher, Aleksandr Kogan, a Russian-American at Cambridge University, to develop a program, or an app, to quiz users on the Facebook site. The researcher took advantage of a loophole in the Facebook application programming interface whereby users taking the quiz did not only had their personal data exposed, but the personal data of their friends as well. Kogan took this information and sold it to Cambridge Analytica, which is part of a social consulting firm in Britain that uses personal information to change public opinions through media propaganda. Steve Bannon was vice president of Cambridge Analytica and later Trump’s advisor, and the information mined from Facebook could’ve had an influence on the election.

The Facebook scandal has further far-reaching ramifications. In the book Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy, Robert W. McChesney argues that celebrants, skeptics, and plain users of the internet are not aware of the effects the internet has on capitalism and what effects capitalism has on the internet and its users. Additionally, there’s democracy being called into question in the turmoil. McChesney is an American professor at the University of Illinois and a Gutgsell Endowed Professor in the Department of Communication, so his positions provide certainty in that he has the authority to speak about such an issue. To understand the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook scandal, a consideration of McChesney’s book for logical key points helps explain the motivations of the researcher and the political machine using personal information.

The Facebook scandal also pointed out that social media users need more adequate awareness of their privacy, and the tools available to them designed to protect their personal data (Nyoni and Velempini). The article uses research information based on the population in South Africa and its current Facebook users.  It studies a sample group by evaluating observations of their regular online activities. The writers discern how users release too much personal information in apps on Facebook belonging to third parties. Their information was sold to online marketers and others with intentions to use their data.

Though ignorant users can be at fault, Facebook has been largely blamed and in the center of a backlash following the event. Included in the public outcry against Facebook are journalists such as Matt Taibbi. He denounces it as a dark and insidious force comparable to an evil empire. In his, “The Facebook Menace,” Taibbi rips into the social media giant, hailing it as a monster swallowing free press, and an indomitable machine spying on people with the effectiveness of a George Orwellian novel. The article hits on emotional beats without adding anything new to the conversation since other media sites are doing the same. His statements are long and sometimes insulting. “But even Fox couldn’t compete with future titans like Facebook when it came to delivering news tailored strictly for the laziest, meanest, least intellectually tolerant version of you,” said Taibbi.

David Kirkpatrick reasons that the problem with Facebook isn’t its massive power, its social media popularity, or its ability to replace old news media outlets, but its ambiguity towards business in the beginning of its creation. This is a critical perspective expounding upon the controversy sounding Facebook, and it’s ethically sound since Kirkpatrick covered Facebook as a journalist since it started. He claims Facebook is trying to be both a humanitarian effort and the fastest growing capitalistic business model simultaneously, which ambition can lead to trouble. There’s lots of money to be made if Facebook focused solely on advertising.

“The data they created turned out to be eminently exploitable—particularly if you wish to target specific groups of people to sell products, ideas or political candidates. It was better than anything advertisers had ever seen,” said Kirkpatrick. The problem lies with how far stretching Facebook can reach in the political sphere and in the privacy of users. “Facebook’s crisis is one of governance. The company faces excruciating choices in how to manage itself, what to communicate with users, what content to allow or ban and how to deal with governments. In many ways, it is more powerful than those governments, in that its reach expands beyond borders to take in the entire world.”  Kirkpatrick statements are measured, reasonable, and neutral, and his proximity to Mark Zuckerberg adds to the logic of what he’s saying.

When Zuckerberg faced Congress, the climactic match up was played over television and online through YouTube. Multiple online commenters posted on various platforms, from blog sites, to official news channels, to Twitter, and many others. Zuckerberg responded to Congress’s questions ranging from rights to privacy to exploitation by Russians. He made efforts to clear up misconceptions about the company, such as how Facebook does not sell users’ private information. They allow third party advertisers to request a position on their platform. Zuckerberg’s concerns adhere to the reality of regulating aggressive forms of fake news, privacy attacking programs, and exploiters of Facebook’s media site, while also trying to maintain a level of freedom where friends can connect and share content around the world. As of now, Facebook has striven to protect users’ information, and had prompted understandable policy regulations on their users’ feeds when they log on to Facebook.

In conclusion, the media and the government are not in favor of the power Facebook wields, especially with the possibilities of how it affected the election and squandered users’ information. Since then, Facebook has changed its policies and continued tried to bring back the trust it lost. It remains to be seen whether the public will ever again be as trusting.

Works Cited

Facebook, 2004, http://www.Facebook.com. Accessed 17 Jun. 2018.

Kirkpatrick, David. “The Facebook Defect.” Time, vol. 191, no. 15, 23 Apr. 2018, pp. 38-44. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.fiu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=129021680&site=eds-live.

McChesney, Robert Waterman. Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet against Democracy. The New Press, 2013.

Nyoni, Phillip and Mthulisi, Velempini. “Privacy and User Awareness on Facebook.” South African Journal of Science, vol. 114, no. 5/6, May/Jun2018, pp. 27-31.

Taibbi, Matt. “The Facebook Menace.” Rolling Stone, no. 1311/1312, 19 Apr. 2018, pp. 42-57. ezproxy.fiu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=128798954&site=eds-live.

Watson, Chloe. “The Key Moments from Mark Zuckerberg’s Testimony to Congress.” The Guardian, 11 Apr. 2018, theguardian.com/technology/2018/apr/11/mark-zuckerbergs-testimony-to-congress-the-key-moments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Final Essay Draft – Team 4

JoAnne, a very impressive essay. Good job! Remember now to include lots of pictures throughout the essay, if you can.

I have made a few suggestions in blue. Mostly I have concentrated on connecting ideas. I added words such as however and nevertheless (and a few other phrases) to provide transitions (connections between ideas). 

SK

 

JoAnne Charles
Final Essay Draft

Princess Hayfa bint Abdullah al-Saud on the Cover of Vogue Arabia:
Ill-Chosen or a Sign of Social and Economical Reform in Saudi?

For decades, Saudi Arabian women were forbidden to drive, even punished for merely being seen behind the driver’s seat. That all ended  on June 24, 2018, when it was revealed that Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman and Saudi’s government unveiled a plan for social and economic reform. Women’s rights movements and women’s rights activists had undertaken certain actions which can arguably be said to have led to the removal of the driving ban. To recognize the lifting of the ban, Her Royal Highness Princess Hayfa bint Abdullah al-Saud, one of the late King Abdullah’s 20 daughters, was recently celebrated on the cover of Vogue Arabia.  Although many applaud the magazine for taking notice of Saudi women’s rights, others point to the fact that many women activists (unlike the princess) fought for and were arrested for the right of women to drive in Saudi Arabia, and are still behind bars. Critics thus say she was ill-chosen for the cover. Princess Hayfa gracing the cover of Vogue in honor of the liberation is a safe way to protest, but also the confirmation that the Saudi government is a least taking taking a turn into a new,liberating direction.

In the recent news article, “Vogue Arabia Cover Highlights Detached Cruelty of GCC Elite,” tweets of backlash are displayed expressing the discontent on behalf of the women’s rights activists who many women believe should have graced the cover. However, if we look at the history of Vogue, we can agree that having the Princess on the cover was a good choice. For instance, the definition of Vogue, according to the Cambridge dictionary, is “the state of being popular or fashionable for a period of time.” In other words, whatever is well-known during a specific time is vogue. This relates to how Vogue Magazine would have chosen Arabian Princess Hayfa to be on the cover of the June issue. Nevertheless, critics on social media were outraged because they felt that she was ill-chosen for the cover. Several critics went so far as to photoshop the faces of the women’s rights activists over the Princess’ face as a symbol of what should have been.

We know that this is right. The women’s rights movement in Saudi Arabia has a long history because in the book A Society of Young Women: Opportunities of Place, Power, and Reform in Saudi Arabia, author Amelie Le Renard says that, “In 1990, during the First Gulf War, forty-seven women got behind the wheel in Riyadh to demand the right to drive . . . . More recently, in spring 2011, several young women launched the Women2Drive campaign, calling on women to drive themselves to their daily destinations.”

If anyone deserved to be on the cover of Vogue, it was probably Manal Al-Sharif, who was popularize by the Women2Drive movement. That movement was an established campaign in 2011 that had a major impact on bringing awareness to the issue worldwide. This campaign encouraged women to post on social media images of themselves driving as a way to fight against the ban. Manal Al-Sharif was at the forefront the movement in 2011 when she published a video of herself driving behind the wheel. This video was then deleted four days later. However, the website source, “Women2Drive” Movement is not entirely credible because upon boarding the website, one sees an unsafe sign displayed. In other words, because of the safety issue, one cannot collectively trust what is coming from the site. Although the website states verifiable information that can be confirmed on other legitimate news sites, scholarly articles, and social media posts, the security of the site is questioned for its reliability. The following is a paragraph from the site:

Taking up the baton from Areej Khan’s ‘We the Women’ campaign against the fatwa on women driving in Saudi Arabia. The Women2Drive campaign has used Youtube, Facebook, and Twitter to mobilize support and take a stronger stand against the ban.

Manal Al-Sharif is one of the most popular women’s rights activists who boldly defied the restricted law. In an eight-minute clip on YouTube, posted in 2011, Manal is seen driving behind a wheel of a black car. In May 2011 Manal al-Sharif posted an 8-minute video online which showed herself driving while articulating a cogent rationale for why women in Saudi Arabia should be allowed to drive. It was viewed more than 700,000 times before being taken down 4 days later. Manal was imprisoned and later released. Women2Drive is now calling on women to apply for driving licenses and then, when their applications are inevitably rejected, to file lawsuits, according to the Women2Drive campaign.

After thorough research on the claims from the site, such as, “The Women2Drive campaign has used Youtube, Facebook, and Twitter to mobilize support and take a stronger stand against the ban,” one can say that this claim is true. Basically, when searching the social sites, it is indeed true that this campaign is used because many people are involved in the discussion. Searching the #Women2Drive hashtag on Twitter, it is evident that this movement indeed existed. It has stirred a national awareness for the right of women to drive among the other platforms used to spread the word.

 

Annotated Bibliography

“Women2Drive” Movement: not so much a credible source because the website is unsafe, so cannot really trust what is coming from the site. Although it does lead to the Women to Drive campaign that is listed on Twitter, Facebook and Youtube. And when searching the social sites, it is indeed true that this campaign is used because many people are involved in the discussion. https://womensrights.informationactivism.org/en/cases/women2drive-saudi-arabia

al-Sharif, Manal. TED: Ideas Worth Spreading, June 2013, www.ted.com/talks/manal_al_sharif_a_saudi_woman_who_dared_to_drive.

Begum, Rothna. “The Brave Female Activists Who Fought to Lift Saudi Arabia’s Driving Ban.” Human Rights Watch, 11 Oct. 2017, www.hrw.org/news/2017/09/29/brave-female-activists-who-fought-lift-saudi-arabias-driving-ban.

“Changes You Can Expect To See In Saudi Arabia In 2018.” ExpatWoman.com, 5 Nov. 2017, www.expatwoman.com/saudi-arabia/guide/changes-you-can-expect-to-see-in-saudi-arabia-in-2018.

“Hayfa Bint Abdullah Al Saud Archives.” News X, 4 June 2018, http://www.newsx.tv/tag/hayfa-bint-abdullah-al-saud/.

“Home.” Wethewomencampaign, www.wethewomencampaign.com/.

HVA. “Female Driving History | Historic Vehicle Association.” 1964 Pontiac Tempest Values | Hagerty Valuation Tool®, 24 Oct. 2012, www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/Articles/2012/10/24/Women-at-the-Wheel.

Mohsin, Huda. “Cyberactivism: the Case of the Women2Drive Movement in Saudi Arabia.” The Environment Is a Feminist Issue, www.fcome.org/portfolio-view/cyberactivism-the-case-of-the-women2drive-movement-in-saudi-arabia/.

“Saudi Arabia: Why Weren’t Women Allowed to Drive? – CBBC Newsround.” BBC, BBC, 13 Jan. 2018, www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/41412980.

“Will End of Women’s Driving Ban Put Saudi Arabia on the Right Road?” Allan & Associates, 10 July 2018, www.allan-assoc.com/analysis/mena-central-asia/will-end-of-womens-driving-ban-put-saudi-arabia-on-the-right-road/.

A society of young women : opportunities of place, power, and reform in Saudi Arabia / Amélie Le Renard. | Book Jacket Language:EnglishAuthors:Le Renard, Amélie, author Publication Information: Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, [2014]

The cities of Saudi Arabia are among the most gender segregated in the world. In recent years the Saudi government has felt increasing international pressure to offer greater roles for women in society. Implicit in these calls for reform, however, is an assumption that the only “real” society is male society. Little consideration has been given to the rapidly evolving activities within women’s spaces. This book joins young urban women in their daily lives–in the workplace, on the female university campus, at the mall–to show how these women are transforming Saudi cities from within and creating their own urban, professional, consumerist lifestyles. As young Saudi women are emerging as an increasingly visible social group, they are shaping new social norms. Their shared urban spaces offer women the opportunity to shed certain constraints and imagine themselves in new roles. But to feel included in this peer group, women must adhere to new constraints: to be sophisticated, fashionable, feminine, and modern. The position of “other” women–poor, rural, or non-Saudi women–is increasingly marginalized. While young urban women may embody the image of a “reformed” Saudi nation, the reform project ultimately remains incomplete, drawing new hierarchies and lines of exclusion among women.Content Notes:Riyadh, a city of closed spaces — Getting around — Coming together — Breaking the rules — Consuming femininities.

 

European migration essay Draft 1

Renee, I’m very impressed! Your evidence and documentation are superb!

I have made a few little suggestions in red.

The final draft is due by noon July 27th (Friday).

Here is how I will be grading the essay

writing quality = (max. 50 points)

visual quality (put in media, images, links, etc.) = max 50 points

logical argument = (max. 50 points)

analysis of the event = (max. 50 points)

use of class lectures, readings, and concepts = (max. 100 points)

how one person, movement, or technology influenced the event = (max. 50 points)

use of sources = (max. 50 points)

 

TOTAL MAX. 400 POINTS

 

 

Renee Roache

Team 04

Europe is experiencing a migrant humanitarian crisis. Recently 630 migrants disembarked onto Spain after being turned away by Italy and Malta.  Although Spain has accepted the migrants, Italy holds a stronger stand against accepting migrants because they want to protect the borders of Europe.  Critics say that more needs to be done to address the failure of the EU asylum system . There is a debate in Europe about which country is responsible to keep the migrants so that the burden is shared fairly among the front lying states. European countries are divided over how to manage the large amounts of migrants incoming from mostly the Middle East and Africa.

The incident started when 630 migrants boarded the Aquarius ship operated by aid agencies Doctors Without Borders and SOS Mediterranean in hopes for a more prosperous future in Europe. The migrants spent more than a week at sea carrying at least 100 minors and seven pregnant women. The Aquarius originally rescued 6 rubber dinghies from the Mediterranean of the coast of Libya. After being at sea for week upon arrival to Italy their new populist government turned the migrants away and did not allow Aquarius to dock a. Italy’s interior minister made anti immigrations campaign promises to stop migrants from exploiting the country’s lax rules. This decision from Italy angered humanitarian groups and other European countries. Finally Spain offered to take them in.

In the Ny Times article “Shunned by Italy, Migrants at Sea Arrive in Spain,”  Raphael Minder’s tone is serious and empathetic. This article uses pathos to appeal to higher emotions to create sympathy for the migrants on their journey to Europe. It also includes a video depicting migrants in a dire state aboard the Aquarious. For example, “After their exhausting journey, migrants shouted with joy as their ships entered Valencia’s port. Some disembarked singing.” This excerpt makes the reader more empathetic to the migrants by putting an emphasis on how exhausting the journey was and how happy the migrants were by shouting and singing for joy upon arriving. Furthermore, Minder appeals to ethos with expert testimonies from David Noguera, the president of the Spanish branch of Doctors Without Borders. The expert testimony from David Noguera increases the credibility and trustworthiness of the article while simultaneously explaining the feelings that humanitarians are facing from Italy closing its ports to migrants in need: “The blockade of European ports sets a very negative precedent.” The NY Times article  created a negative viewpoint toward Italy’s new government and how the migrants were treated.

The BBC article “Aquarius in Valencia: Spain welcomes migrants from disputed ship” takes a more informative tone with a question and answer writing style. The article establishes logos by using statistics and providing sources to support the article by using a chart to show the Mediterranean migrant arrivals in 2018. Also, the article uses another detailed map to show exactly where the migrants are coming from and their journey. The author appeals to pathos by using diction to create pity for the migrants’ conditions on the boat: “The migrants spent 20 hours in overcrowded rubber dinghies before being rescued by the Aquarius. They have since spent a week in rough seas – with many suffering seasickness.” The author establishes ethos while simultaneously appealing to pathos by using an expert testimony from Sophie Beau of aid organization SOS Mediterranean . Her quotes express the harsh conditions of travel and the dire state that the migrants are in: “The weather was very bad unfortunately, and the sea was rough,” “So people are in a bad state…, and they are really relieved to come on safe land at the moment.”.

Many locals have criticized the government and spoken about how the migrants that come from Aquarius are treated tremendously differently than migrants that arrive to Spain from Morocco including Spanish journalist Gabriela Sanchez in the El Diaro article “Lo Que Pasa Con Los Migrantes Que Vienen a España En Patera Si No Son Los Rescatados Del Aquarius,” she uses an informative and critical tone.  Sanchez establishes logos by using facts and statistics to show support for the argument that the migration system is broken: “Last year, 22,103 people arrived on Spanish coasts compared to the 8,162 registered in 2016.” Sanchez also appeals to pathos by trying to garner pity for the migrants’ horrible conditions and also ask why won’t these migrants get better treatment: “There is a series of basic rules for assistance and identification of the dead: they apply to train accidents, plane crashes, terrorist attacks … why is it not activated after shipwrecks? Why is it because they are black?” This article focuses mainly on the broken system and what happens after arrival . The El Diario article gives a necessary perspective of how the people of Spain view Europe migration system.

What will happen once the migration system starts to perform properly in Europe? Nicolas Genova gives his take in the book Borders of Europe: Autonomy of Migration Tactics of Bordering. Nicholas De Genova discusses that amidst the migration challenges Europe is having an identity crisis, where European citizen see the lack of border control as a threat to European sense of self. Additionally, the book discusses how the deaths at European borders are being disregarded and how the Mediterranean is committed to human rights and trade but also has militarized borders that kill migrants and separate societies. Nicholas De Genova is an lecturer in human geography and has a Ph.D. in Anthropology, so his positions allow for certainty that he is authoritative figure and can speak about this topic. To understand the migration crisis in Europe this book will help provide a detailed reflection or this disorderly time in migration’s history.

In the book Migration in the New Europe: East-West Revisted, by Agata Gorny and Paolo Ruspini, the authors study new migration policy developments while the European Union expands. Gorny also argues that the new concept of Europeans changing the migration space is starting to change traditional divisions of Eastern and Western Europe because of the ongoing migration working simultaneously.This book has an ethically sound perspective of migration in Europe because Gorny is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Economic Sciences at Warsaw University while Ruspini is a Political Scientist and he is an Associate at the Centre for research in ethnic relations. Within the book they explore the possibility of creating a common European Union immigration policy and they discuss the after effects of what such policies could mean for Europe.

In conclusion, the media and the people of Europe are not responding favorably to how the European union is taking care of the migrant humanitarian crisis, especially the mistreatment of the migrants before and after arrival. Since the arrival of the migrants to Spain there has still not been any major legal changes to the European migration laws and everyone can agree that serious legal reform needs to take place for European migration laws.

Bibliography

Charner, Flora. “Hundreds of Migrants Turned Away by Italy Arrive in Spain.” CNN, Cable News Network, 17 June 2018, http://www.cnn.com/2018/06/17/europe/migrant-ships-dock-spain/index.html.

De Genova, Nicholas . “The borders of “Europe” : autonomy of migration, tactics of bordering.”

Durham : Duke University Press, 2017. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost),17 June 2018.

Gorny,Agata .”Migration in the new Europe­” Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire [England] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. eBook Collection , 17 June 2018

Minder, Raphael. “Shunned by Italy, Migrants at Sea Arrive in Spain.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 17 June 2018, nytimes.com/2018/06/17/world/europe/spain-migrant-ship-italy.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fworld.

Sanchez, Gabriela. “Lo Que Pasa Con Los Migrantes Que Vienen a España En Patera Si No Son Los Rescatados Del Aquarius.” es, Eldiario.es, 14 June 2018, www.eldiario.es/desalambre/migrantes-vienen-Espana-rescatados-Aquarius_0_782172656.html.

Facebook Scandal First Draft

Henry, very impressive essay. I think it’s solid and covers all the bases.

You will need to sprinkle graphics throughout the essay, too. Please see below how I am required to evaluate your essay.

SK 7/13/18

When I grade the final essay (due July 30), I will use Professor Pearson’s guidelines:

  1. Writing quality = 1- 50 points
  2. Visual quality = layout, images, videos, media, 1-50 points
  3. Logic (does it make sense) = 1-50 points
  4. Analysis of the event (did you really pick this topic apart?) = 1-50 points
  5. Use of class lectures, readings and concepts = 1-100 points
  6. How a person, movement or technology influenced the event = 1-50 points
  7. Use of sources, at least one scholarly = 1-50 points

 

 

By Henry Antenor

Team Fantastic Four

 

 

 

Since the Cambridge Analytica Scandal, Facebook and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg have been under constant pressure from government and the public. Facebook’s security compromise raises worries about user privacy, user information, and mass manipulation during key national events such as the presidential elections. The media have expressed a range of opinions about Facebook, both for and against. The public has not been entirely accepting of Facebook’s wavering reaction to the pressure.

To begin with, the scandal happened due to an oversight, when Facebook allowed a third-party researcher, Aleksandr Kogan, a Russian-American at Cambridge University, to develop a program, or an app, to quiz users on the Facebook site. The researcher took advantage of a loophole in the Facebook application programming interface whereby users taking the quiz did not only had their personal data exposed, but the personal data of their friends as well. Kogan took this information and sold it to Cambridge Analytica, which is part of a social consulting firm in Britain that uses personal information to change public opinions through media propaganda. Steve Bannon was vice president of Cambridge Analytica and later Trump’s advisor, and the information mined from Facebook could’ve had an influence on the election.

In the book Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy, Robert W. McChesney argues that celebrants, skeptics, and plain users of the internet are not aware of the effects the internet has on capitalism and what effects capitalism has on the internet and its users. Additionally, there’s democracy being called into question in the turmoil. McChesney is an American professor at the University of Illinois and a Gutgsell Endowed Professor in the Department of Communication, so his positions provide certainty in that he has the authority to speak about such an issue. To understand the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook scandal, a consideration of McChesney’s book for logical key points helps explain the motivations of the researcher and the political machine using that information.

Additionally, social media users need more adequate awareness of their privacy, and the tools available to them designed to protect their personal data, which is an argument by (Nyoni and Velempini). in their journal article “Privacy and user awareness on Facebook.” The article uses research information based on the population in South Africa and its current Facebook users; it studies a sample group by evaluating observations of their regular online activities. The writers discern how users release too much personal information in apps on Facebook that belong to third parties, having their information sold to online marketers, let alone anyone else with intentions to use their data.

Though some fault can be found in the ignorance of users, Facebook has been largely blamed and in the center of a backlash following the event. Facebook’s spiraling situation of public outcry includes journalists Included in the ;public outcry against Facebook are journalists such as Matt Taibbi, who denounced it as a dark and insidious force comparable to an evil empire. In his Rolling Stone article, “The Facebook Menace,” Taibbi rips into the social media giant, hailing it as a monster swallowing free press, and an indomitable machine spying on people with the effectiveness of a George Orwellian novel. The article hits on emotional beats without adding anything new to the conversation since other media sites are doing the same. He goes into long statements, sometimes insulting. “But even Fox couldn’t compete with future titans like Facebook when it came to delivering news tailored strictly for the laziest, meanest, least intellectually tolerant version of you,” said Taibbi.

David Kirkpatrick reasons that the problem with Facebook isn’t its massive power, its social media popularity, or its ability to replace old news media outlets, but its ambiguity towards business in the beginning of its creation. This is a critical perspective expounding upon the controversy sounding Facebook, and it’s ethically sound since Kirkpatrick covered Facebook as a journalist since it started. He claims Facebook is trying to be both a humanitarian effort and the fastest growing capitalistic business model simultaneously, which ambition can lead to trouble. There’s lots of money to be made if Facebook focused solely on advertising.

“The data they created turned out to be eminently exploitable—particularly if you wish to target specific groups of people to sell products, ideas or political candidates. It was better than anything advertisers had ever seen,” said Kirkpatrick. The problem lies with how far stretching Facebook can reach in the political sphere and in the privacy of users. “Facebook’s crisis is one of governance. The company faces excruciating choices in how to manage itself, what to communicate with users, what content to allow or ban and how to deal with governments. In many ways, it is more powerful than those governments, in that its reach expands beyond borders to take in the entire world,” Kirkpatrick said. His statements are measured, reasonable, and neutral, and his proximity to Mark Zuckerberg adds to the logic of what he’s saying.

When it came down to Zuckerberg facing Congress, the climatic match up was played over television and online through YouTube. Multiple online commenters posted on various platforms, from blog sites, to official news channels, to Twitter, and many others. Zuckerberg responded to Congress’s questions ranging from rights to privacy to exploitation by Russians. He made efforts to clear up misconceptions about the company, such as how Facebook does not sell users’ private information. They allow third party advertisers to request a position on their platform. Zuckerberg’s concerns adhere to the reality of regulating aggressive forms of fake news, privacy attacking programs, and exploiters of Facebook’s media site, while also trying to maintain a level of freedom where friends can connect and share content around the world. As of now, Facebook has made strives striven to protecting users’ information, and has prompted understandable policy regulations on their users’ feeds when they log on to Facebook.

In conclusion, the media and the government are not in favor of the power Facebook wields, especially with the possibilities of how it affected the election and squandered users’ information. Since then, Facebook has changed its policies and continued to bring back the trust it lost.

Works Cited

Facebook, 2004, http://www.Facebook.com. Accessed 17 Jun. 2018.

Kirkpatrick, David. “The Facebook Defect.” Time, vol. 191, no. 15, 23 Apr. 2018, pp. 38-44. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.fiu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=129021680&site=eds-live.

McChesney, Robert Waterman. Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet against Democracy. The New Press, 2013.

Nyoni, Phillip and Mthulisi, Velempini. “Privacy and User Awareness on Facebook.” South African Journal of Science, vol. 114, no. 5/6, May/Jun2018, pp. 27-31.

Taibbi, Matt. “The Facebook Menace.” Rolling Stone, no. 1311/1312, 19 Apr. 2018, pp. 42-57. ezproxy.fiu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=128798954&site=eds-live.

Watson, Chloe. “The Key Moments from Mark Zuckerberg’s Testimony to Congress.” The Guardian, 11 Apr. 2018, theguardian.com/technology/2018/apr/11/mark-zuckerbergs-testimony-to-congress-the-key-moments. Annotation:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

48 Hour News Blackout

In today’s digital era, we are more digitally connected than ever before, but as disconnected from reality as ever before. We seek likes for validation and our FOMO (fear of missing out) has never been greater. In the essay, “The End of Solitude,” William Deresiewicz successfully captures the effect technology has on the contemporary self. He argues, “Technology is taking away our privacy, our concentration, but it is also taking away our ability to be alone.”  We are constantly communicating through SMS and social media platforms that allow us to stay up to date with our “friends” and relay news to the public instantaneously. Ironically, as we become more digitally connected, we become more disconnected from reality. For example, dinner has previously been reserved as a meal where the family eats in unison, where they talk and share how their day went. It’s the time of day the family interacts with one another and disconnects from the outside world. But, look around the next time you dine out and you’ll see how many people are so fixated on their phones, they barely look up to say a word to each other.

In this digitally rich society, we obsess over sharing every moment of our lives with our followers, then we obsess over the number of likes the post receives as if it were some form of validation. But, why do we do this? The contemporary-self craves to be known. As Deresiewicz explains, “This is what the contemporary self wants. It wants to be recognized, wants to be connected: It wants to be visible. If not to the millions, on Survivor or Oprah, then to the hundreds, on Twitter or Facebook. This is the quality that validates us, this is how we become real to ourselves — by being seen by others.” He claims the camera has created a culture of celebrity, while the computer has created a culture of connectivity. Both technologies have merged to feed our interconnectivity but have affected our ability to be alone. I, myself, am guilty of this overindulgence. I am constantly checking Instagram, Facebook, and Snapchat; in fact, I’ve found myself waste hours on Facebook and for what? Half the people on my Facebook I wouldn’t even say hello to if I saw in public. I post a picture on Instagram and check back repeatedly to see the number of likes I get. I’m so worried about sharing the moment, I miss out on fully capturing that moment and taking it all in. All these actions satisfy my need for visibility.

For 48 hours, I underwent a digital detox. I disconnected from the digital world, and truly, I was in desperate need of it.  ­­­I learned a lot about my social habits from this experience. For once, I noticed in public settings I turned to my phone as a security blanket to avoid social interaction with people. I don’t understand why I do this. I am actually a very outgoing person, but I found myself digging through my phone on elevators avoiding eye contact with people. Even when I ate in public alone, I saw myself searching for my phone or desperately trying to find somewhere to look. I began to analyze why I do these things and I realize it’s solitude that makes me uncomfortable. As Deresiewicz put it, “They have lost the ability to be alone, their capacity for solitude.” and to not feel So that we don’t feel that loneliness, we busy ourselves with faux social activities.

Well written. I think it would have been even stronger if you had spent more time and space your own reaction to the blackout period and less to summarizing Deresiewicz. That’s what Prof. Pearson was looking for. But otherwise a good effort.

Canada’s Prime Minister is Becoming a Woman | Fake News Article

You are such great fakers! You made me laugh out loud. Very creative, interesting, farcical–yet with sensitive undertones. You should be writing for Saturday Night Live. Excellent quotes, graphics, and comic touches. 

 

 

Team 4

Trudeau quotes: Renee Roache

Trump quotes/Twitter links: Laura Villa

LGBTQ+ community quotes: Alyssa Torres

Trudeau’s relative quotes: JoAnne Charles

Initial Editor/Pictures: Caitlin Ferguson

Final Editor: Henry Antenor

Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, has had talks about being transgender, and wanting to transition into a woman. This has become such widespread news to the point where President of the United States Donald Trump has even made a comment on it, which is typical because Trump comments on everything. His comment on this was not surprising.

“This is sad. We’re in the middle of negotiations on NAFTA and he wants to steal the spotlight,” Trump said over a phone call.

“Now I’m not judging. In a free society you do what you want,” Trump continued. “But you’re the prime minister of Canada. And we’re in talks of changing how we trade. Pick a better time. If you ask the Trans community here, they’ll agree with me. But it’s okay. I’ll make sure our negotiations are settled. That’s why I make the big bucks.”

Image result for president trump on phone

President of the United States Donald Trump on the phone, talking about Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau

 

Trudeau’s coming out as transgender has not only impacted the President of the United States, but also his brother and wife. They were supportive of his decision, his brother commenting that he wasn’t really surprised and that growing up, he always knew there was something different about him.

“Justin always said he wanted to give other people the right to be themselves even if it meant losing himself in the process,” younger brother Alexandre Trudeau says.

His wife commented on the fact that this change is going to be good for him because it is going to give him the opportunity to lead as the person he truly is. A good leader is always true to themselves, and that is who Trudeau is going to be.

“I think this change will be good for him,” wife Sophie Trudeau says, “a chance to lead our country in integrity by being who he truly is.”

Image result for justin and sophie trudeau

Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Trudeau

 

Trudeau talked about how his wife has always been such an activist for women’s rights, and that one time they had a conversation about how he wasn’t giving his sons the same attention and support that he was giving his daughter.

“I’m incredibly proud to have a partner in my wife Sophie, who is extremely committed to women and girls’ issues. But she took me aside a few months ago and said “Okay, it’s great that you’re engaged and modeling to your daughter that you want her empowered and everything, but you need to take as much effort to talk to your sons” — my 8-year-old boy and my 2-year-old — “about how he treats women.”

Trudeau has hinted at being transgender since September of 2014, as seen in the tweets below.

 

The LGBTQ+ community also has had a lot to say about this topic. Victoria Watson, 18 years old transgender male to female, says that her experiences leave her convinced that all levels of government must do more for sexual minorities at risk. “…a lot of times, when people are at the lowest of their lows, they will attack someone else, to try to make themselves feel higher, and LGBTQ+ are the easiest to attack, because even with all the progress, we are still misunderstood.”

Wayne Fitton hopes this will encourage all Canadians “to accept, promote and embrace justice and well-being for all people.”

Though there is still much to be done, with this, Canada will have gone further to secure and advance the rights of sexual minorities than any other country in the world. In that sense, Trudeau coming out as transgender is really a celebration. There has never been a time and place where it was so okay to be queer.

Trudeau knows it and is flattered by it. On this day, he’s enjoying the intellectual exercise of deconstructing our collective fascination with him and piecing it back together again.

“The old Justin will always live on inside of me,” said the Prime Minister. “I have always felt closer to a female identity from birth but I felt as if politics were not ready for the first transgender prime minister, but now I think that the world is ready for a transgender female leader. Throughout my lifetime many questions went through my head: “Am I just a cross-dresser? Am I gay?” I was clearly struggling with gender dysphoria. I looked in the mirror and hated what I saw. It’s not like I want to get rid of this person. I just want to be Justine and be the best leader that Canada deserves.”

Image result for justin trudeau pride

Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau Marches in Toronto Pride Parade

 

REFLECTIVE PARAGRAPH:

The way we wrote this article was by first finding and coming up with quotes from Trump, Trudeau, Trudeau’s brother and wife, and members of the LGBTQ+ community. We found these quotes, and then changed some things around so that they related more to our topic. Then, we added pieces of information before/after each quote to add more context and make the whole article more cohesive. Our rhetorical appeal was pathos, because we wanted to appeal to the reader’s emotions. How would this article make the reader feel? Our intended audience was people of the LGBTQ+ community and also people in Canada, as this “news” would affect them the most. Our other audience was people in the United States who like to stay up to date on the news in Canada. Our hook was based on the interest readers would find in seeing a world leader become a transgender in the middle of office, and would possibly be a topic of ridicule by the right, while a huge topic of praise by the left. In order to grab the reader’s attention, we had to pick a bizarre topic, one that we wouldn’t typically see online. Trudeau being transgender is a topic that would seem interesting and different to readers. To still maintain credibility, we used Trudeau and Trump’s own quotes, but changed around the wording to make it relevant to the topic.

JoAnne Charles – Team 4: Secrets and Revelation

Good job, JoAnne. Clear, flowing, personal narrative. 

 

SK

 

Team 4: Secrets and Revelations
by JoAnne Charles

On the last week of April, my family and I planned a surprise dinner party for my sister. My mom was in charge of the planning and she told everyone to keep it a secret. My brother and I were expected not to tell. I knew beforehand this would be a hard secret to keep confidential because my sister and I are best friends. I also knew this secret would mean I have to lie. Days before her birthday, I kept silent. When she asked questions pertaining to the day, I kept a stoic expression. I practiced this expression in the mirror until I fooled myself. My mom needed details of her schedule, so it was up to me to find out whether she’d be available during the time of her dinner party. It was hard not to crack a smile, but with practice, I had done in the mirror, I became unstoppable; I was ready to lie.

When the day approached for me to lie, my sister had already grown suspicious. I asked her weird questions in my overtly stern voice, establishing whether she would be available. She asked if our mom was planning something for her birthday this year. I frowned and looked through the wall and said I had no idea. She looked at me again. This time dead in the eye like she knew something I did not know. I was determined to keep this lie a secret. After all, it was for her benefit so that she would be surprised and happy. She changed the subject quickly as if she knew I was lying. “Had I blown it?” I thought to myself. Then I swiftly spat out another lie, which sounded like speaking in a foreign language. I did not plan to lie twice. I told her that we needed to know in case we should bring her gifts. “She’s not that dumb,” I thought to myself. But she ended up believing the lie.

When she came into the restaurant on the day of her birthday, her eyes grew wide. Pink balloons, a candle-lit cake, and a beautiful family shouting at the top of our lungs, “Happy Birthday!” This made me realize that lying is hard work. To lie opens the door for even more lies to cover up, which is exhausting. This is especially exhausting when you forget what you lie about. It also made me think that if someone is going to tell a lie, they would have to write down every lie so that they remember. And when they are asked questions about that lie, they can keep track of their lies to lie even more. But at the same time, the truth will set you free from all the burdens and weights of lying. In other words, a clear conscious conscience is always worth telling the truth. I came to the revelation that truth is as light as a feather, and carrying a lie is as heavy as an anchor.